Flipped Webcast Conversation with Chris Gilliard About Digital Redlining

Notes:
- Be sure to watch Chris's Presentation before the webcast
- Register here.

Chris Gilliard was the 2018 WCET Annual Meeting keynote speaker who shared with the audience how we can understand equal access to technology and information in the digital age. His presentation looked at how technology policies, practices, and investment decisions, especially in educational settings, create differential access and outcomes in colleges and universities. These processes, collectively understood as “digital redlining,” need to be understood and countered in order to create a more equitable educational structure.

We wanted to provide an opportunity for conference attendees and others in the WCET community to ask questions about Chris’s presentation and Digital Redlining. If you were unable to view the presentation at the Annual Meeting in Portland, view a previously recorded presentation from the University of Oklahoma’s 2018 Academic Tech Expo on the topic ahead of the live conversation and bring your questions.

Join us on Friday, January 25 at noon MDT a free WCET Flipped Webcast. Follow the Twitter feed at #WCETwebcast.
This webcast is provided free and open to all.  

Register today for the WCET webcast, the conversation will run for 60 minutes and take place via Zoom.
The webcast will be recorded and available on the webpage with captions shortly after the live session. If you prefer live captioning during the webcast, please contact us.

Friday, January 25 at: 9:00 AM HST/ 10:00 AM AKST/ 11:00 AM PST/ Noon MST/ 1:00 PM CST/ 2:00 PM EST

Speaker:

Chris GilliardChris Gilliard
Professor of English,
Macomb Community College

Chris Gilliard’s work concentrates on privacy, institutional tech policy, digital redlining, and the re-inventions of discriminatory practices through data mining and algorithmic decision-making, especially as these apply to college students. He is currently developing a project that looks at how popular misunderstandings of mathematical concepts create illusions of fairness and objectivity in student analytics, predictive policing, and hiring practices.

Moderator:

Megan RaymondMegan Raymond
Director, Programs and Sponsorship,
WCET

Megan Raymond has been with WICHE since 2007. She directs the programs, events, and sponsorships for WCET, the national leader in the practice, policy, and advocacy of technology-enhanced learning in higher education. Prior to WICHE, Megan was entrenched in student affairs at a small liberal arts college. In her spare time, she enjoys racing mountain bikes and chasing her son on his bike or feet. Her overly hyper and eternal puppy, Rango, also keeps her on her toes.